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Sad truth hidden in Australian Open champion Jannik Sinner’s ‘perfect parents’ speech

Sad truth hidden in Australian Open champion Jannik Sinner’s ‘perfect parents’ speech

Jannik Sinner has been lauded as the man finally ushering in a new generation in men’s tennis after winning an Australian Open title forged by knocking off Novak Djokovic in the semi-finals.

But the 22-year-old’s swift rise to the very top of the sport hasn’t come easy on the personal front.

WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE: Jannik Sinner opens up in ‘perfect parents’ speech.

Watch the latest sport on Channel 7 or stream for free on 7plus >>

Little more than 10 years ago the Italian was a snow sports champion, and by the time he became a teenager his tennis took hold — and that meant there was a decision to make.

Sinner spoke lovingly in his on-court speech about his parents giving him the freedom to explore his sporting interests before seriously pursuing a career in the sport where he has now made his name.

“I wished that everyone could have my parents because they always let me choose whatever I wanted to,” he said.

“Even when I was younger I also made some other sports and they never put pressure on myself, and I wish that this freedom is possible for as many young kids as possible. Thank you so much for my parents.”

Australian Open champion Jannik Sinner celebrates with the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup. Credit: Shi Tang/Getty Images

The public comments won over new fans and sent a message to the world on how to let kids enjoy life and sport while they can.

Yet Sinner soon revealed even that pressure-free journey to grand slam winner has affected his relationship with his parents, having already spent almost half of his 22 years living away from home.

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“I don’t see them so often, unfortunately,” Sinner conceded in his post-match press conference.

“But when I see them it’s always a great time.”

Distance was first put between parents and child when Sinner was still just a boy.

Hailing from the tiny northern Italian town of Sesto (population 1860) near the Austrian border, where morning temperatures can be down to -20C, he moved south to the Italian Riviera to train with famed coach Riccardo Piatti.

“I went away from home when I was 14 years old, so I had to grow up quite fast — trying to cook for myself, trying to make laundry,” Sinner said.

“You know, the first times it is different but then in the other way, that was maybe the fastest way to grow up.

“I think for me it was tough, but for the parents to leave their son at 14 years old, it’s also not easy. They always gave me (opportunity), they never put pressure on myself, which for me is maybe the key why I’m here today.

“I’m a very quite relaxed man, who just enjoys playing tennis. I’m 22 years old so I also enjoy doing normal stuff.

“And that’s it, no? They are the perfect parents. Obviously I know only them but they are awesome. And also my brother, who brings me honesty throughout the whole career I’m going through.”

Jannik Sinner with his parents (back row, left and second from left) and other family and coaches after winning the Next Gen title in 2019. Credit: Instagram

About 70 people gathered inside a two-court indoor tennis facility in Sinner’s hometown to watch the final, which started at 9.30am in Sesto and ran for the most of the day.

It might have been a bigger celebration but the town was in mourning after a mother and two children were recently killed in a car accident.

“It’s an incredible achievement that provides joy for us all during a time of great pain,” Sesto mayor Thomas Summerer said.

“Tomorrow we will all go to the funeral but Jannik has provided us with positive emotions to help us get through this.”

Sinner was already the toast of Italy before the Australian Open, having helped the country win the Davis Cup title in November.

But his first grand slam title has now sealed his status as a rare non-football athlete to break through to superstardom.

“Jannik Sinner wrote a new page of history today that fills us with pride,” Italian Premier Giorgia Meloni wrote after the young gun’s victory in Melbourne.

“It’s an achievement worthy of a real champion.”

The attention is also due to the fact that no Italian man had won a grand slam singles in nearly half-a-century — not since Adriano Panatta raised the French Open trophy in 1976.

“And trust me, this is just the first of many grand slam finals,” said Flavia Pennetta, the last Italian woman to win a grand slam after she defeated compatriot Roberta Vinci in the 2015 US Open final.

– with AAP

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